Sept 7: IS DIGITAL JOURNALISM MAKING US “STUPIDER”?

The news landscape is being deformed by “fake” news sites, bots and disinformation created by Macedonian teenagers. The Internet drives audiences to clickbait and cat videos. Mainstream news organizations struggle to make their news sites profitable again. Yet the urgent need for reliable information remains. The future of our democracy depends on us being more skeptical and more “news literate.”

Jeffrey Dvorkin is director of the journalism program at the University of Toronto (Scarborough). He has an M.A (Modern European History) University of Toronto and an M.Phil. (International History) London School of Economics. Through the 1990s, he was responsible for all journalistic content as Managing Editor and Chief Journalist for CBC Radio. In 1997, he was named Vice-President, News and Information at NPR in Washington, DC where he subsequently became NPR’s first news ombudsman. His take on our digital dilemma, “Critical News Literacy” is being published by Routledge.

 

Sept 14: TREATY MAKING AND BREAKING IN CANADA

The foundation of the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canadians is the treaty. But treaties are misunderstood, with overlapping agreements across regions as well as divergent interpretations. This presentation considers three eras of treaties, from Indigenous-led treaty-making to confederation-era treaties, and so-called modern treaties, and reflects on their consequences.

Hayden King is from Beausoleil First Nation on Gchi’mnissing in Huronia, Ontario, and was partly raised in Collingwood. He has been teaching Indigenous politics and policy since 2007 with academic positions at McMaster, Carleton and Ryerson universities. Currently in the Faculty of Arts at Ryerson he is the Director of the Yellowhead Institute. He is also an adjunct professor of research at Carleton and a Senior Fellow at Massey College. He previously served as the Senior Policy Advisor to the Ontario Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, Director of Research at the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, Scholar-in-Residence at the Conference Board of Canada.

 

Sept. 21: INUIT ART IN CANADA

The professionalization and marketing for Inuit artists has greatly changed. For 30 years the Inuit Art Foundation has been advocating for and supporting the increasing success of Inuit artists and the market as a whole. This lecture will broadly cover the history of Inuit art and how the Inuit Art Foundation as well as the Inuit Art Quarterly have been pillars of support in artists’ professionalization and self-determination.

Alysa Procida is the Executive Director of the Inuit Art Foundation and Publisher of the Inuit Art Quarterly. She joined the Foundation in 2015 bringing a wealth of experience with Inuit art and non-profit leadership. Prior to becoming the Foundation’s Executive Director, Alysa was the Executive Director and Curator of the Museum of Inuit Art in Toronto. Over her career she has written and presented internationally on the subject of using media to champion Inuit art.

 

Sept 28: G’DAY EH AND ALL THAT STUFF: DIALECTS IN ONTARIO

Did you know Ontario has many dialects? The Ontario Dialects Project is an ongoing research program studying how and why language changes. By studying the differences in words, expressions and sayings across the province, we can track the history and culture of communities, document local language features that are fading away and provide important evidence for the study of language and society.

Sali A. Tagliamonte is Canada Research Chair in Language Variation and Change and a Full Professor of Linguistics at University of Toronto. She is the author of six books, including “Roots of English: (2013) and “Teen Talk” (2016). She publishes academic research on British, Irish and Canadian dialects, teen language and television and is currently the President of the American Dialect Society.